Beauty

American analytic philosopher Guy Sircello proposed his New Theory of Beauty as an effort to reaffirm the status of beauty as an essential philosophical idea. He rejected the subjectivism of Kant and sought to identify the properties inherent in an object that make it beautiful. He referred to as qualities corresponding to vividness, boldness, and subtlety “properties of qualitative diploma” and acknowledged that a PQD makes an object beautiful if it isn’t—and does not create the looks of—”a property of deficiency, lack, or defect”; and if the PQD is strongly present in the object. The twentieth century noticed an increasing rejection of beauty by artists and philosophers alike, culminating in postmodernism’s anti-aesthetics. This is despite beauty being a central concern of certainly one of postmodernism’s main influences, Friedrich Nietzsche, who argued that the Will to Power was the Will to Beauty. In the Romantic interval, Edmund Burke postulated a distinction …